Restorative Yoga Sequence

by Restorative Yoga Poses on July 24, 2011

Reasons To Learn Restorative Yoga Sequence

Sitting on a chair, in front of a computer, for long hours leads to bad posture and back problems. Your muscles may feel strained and tight. If you habitually feel anxious and fatigued, it is time to learn restorative yoga sequence. With the busy and stressful lives that most of us lead, our bodies and minds are perpetually exhausted. The high level of stress leaves you unable to relax. Hence, you feel tense and stressed out most of the time.

Fortunately, restorative yoga is an exceptional antidote for stress and helps to re-align the body, mind, spirit to be promote health and a feeling of strong, stable energy. Restorative yoga is a unique form of yoga that aims to stimulate the parasympathetic nervous system of the body. When the body faces stressors, the sympathetic nervous system is activated. The body is posed for the fight or flight response. The parasympathetic nervous system helps the body regain its balance, and calms it.

With practice of the restorative yoga sequences one can lower blood pressure and heart rate. In the long run this helps improve the body’s immune system and health. You will also find that you are able to concentrate and meditate better than you could earlier.

Usually restorative yoga requires the use of props that help the body achieve yoga poses effectively. Some commonly used props include yoga block, strap, blankets, bolsters and wall. They are used to relax the body while you maintain a yoga pose such as the ‘supported child’s pose’ or the ‘adho mukha virasana’. You will need to maintain a pose for as long as you can comfortably.

You can practice restorative yoga sequence at any time of the day. Many people, who find it difficult to relax after a long day, can benefit by performing restorative yoga before they go to bed. Some of the many benefits of this form of exercise include relief from headaches, back pain, strained neck and shoulder muscles, and fatigue.

Examples of Restorative Yoga Sequences:

Headache Relief Restorative Yoga Sequence:
Allot 30-45 minutes to perform this gentle sequence.
Supported Child’s Pose
With a bolster positioned between your thighs allow your body to drape over the support and rest your head to one side. (Rest here for 3 to 5 minutes.)
Supported Head-to-Knee Forward Fold
Rest your head and torso on a bolster laid across your extended leg. Rest on each side for 1 to 3 minutes.
Supported Wide Angle Pose
Support your head on a bolster placed between your legs. (Rest here for 1 to 2 minutes.)
Supported Forward Fold
Lie onto a bolster placed on top of your legs. (Rest here for 1 to 3 minutes.)
Supported Reclining Bound Angle Pose
Support the torso on a rolled blanket or bolster positioned beneath and parallel to your spine. (Rest here for 3 to 5 minutes.)
Supported Bridge Pose
Support the torso on a bolster and rest the sacrum on a block. Allow the shoulders and head to rest lightly on the floor. Add a neck pillow if comfortable (Rest here for 3 to 5 minutes.)
Viparita Karani (Legs-Up-the-Wall Pose)
Support the pelvis with either on a bolster or on a rolled blanket. (Rest here for 4 to 5 minutes.) Use caution when exiting the pose and turn first to your side sliding slowly off the support.
Supported Corpse Pose
Breathe gently into the whole body and allow the body to sink into the earth. Allow the inhalation to softly enter and exhale for 5-8 counts. Take a pause for 3-5 seconds before your next inhale. Breathe in balance, calm, and peace and exhale judgement, expectation, and anything else that is not serving you. Be present and stay in the moment. Allow yourself this time to relax and renew. (Total time 10 to 15 minutes.)

Restorative Yoga Sequence for Menstruation
Recommended time: 45 to 60 minutes
Supported Reclining Bound Angle Pose
Support the torso on a rolled blanket or bolster positioned beneath and parallel to your spine. (Rest here for 3 to 5 minutes.)
Supta Padangusthasana (Reclining Big Toe Pose)
Place your head on a yoga blanket, an eye pillow on your eyes, and use a strap to hold the raised leg in place. Hold each side for 2-3 minutes; rest here for a total time of 4-6 minutes.
Supported Reclining Bound Angle Pose
Support the torso on a rolled blanket or bolster positioned beneath and parallel to your spine. (Rest here for 3 to 5 minutes.)
Janu Sirsasana (Head-to-Knee Pose)
Support your head on a bolster laid on top of your extended leg and use a strap to keep length through the pose. Hold each side for 3 to 5 minutes; rest here for a total time of 6 to 10 minutes.
Supported Forward Fold
Lie onto a bolster placed on top of your legs. (Rest here for 3 to 5 minutes.)
Supported Wide Angle Pose
Support your head on a bolster placed between your legs. (Rest here for 3 to 5 minutes.)
Side-Lying Savasana with A Twist
Find your way into this gentle twist using two pillows or a pillow and a bolster. Use a neck roll and eye mask for extra comfort.
Supported Corpse Pose
Practice diaphragmatic breathing for 3-5 minutes and then resume a gentle breath cycle by allowing the inhalation to softly enter and exhale for 5-8 counts. Take a pause for 3-5 seconds before your next inhale. Breathe in balance, calm, and peace and exhale judgement, expectation, and anything else that is not serving you. Be present and stay in the moment. Allow yourself this time to relax and renew. (Total time 10 to 15 minutes.)

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Glenn January 4, 2014 at 3:52 am

This site is just what I am looking for. I really appreciate the information that is available. I like the examples of the restorative yoga sequences. I noticed there are two examples posted with great links to images and details. Is there a book or DVD available with other sequences? I am interested in specifically working my neck and lower back area. These are areas that I continue to have problems with and I know that restorative yoga is the answer. Thanks in advance for your help

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